January 1, 2015

This December, the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco was awarded the 2014 YOUniversal Global Fine Art Award, one of a series of prizes recognizing the best fine art exhibitions and installations. The de Young’s presentation of David Hockney: A Bigger Exhibition was selected for the YOUniversalaward by public vote from a nominee list culled from more than 1,000 exhibitions at more than 200 museums in 18 countries. The exhibition also received an Honorable Mention for the Contemporary Art Award.

Although A Bigger Exhibition closed in January 2014, one of Hockney’s works featured in it, Seven Yorkshire Landscape Videos (2011), remains on view just north of Wilsey Court at the de Young. Hockney, renowned for his use of evolving technologies as well as traditional media, has become increasingly interested in chronicling the passage of time. Back in his native England, after living in Southern California for 25 years, Hockney rediscovered the landscapes of Woldgate Woods in East Yorkshire and set out to document its changing seasons. In 2010 and 2011 he made digital videos of these woods, depicting the same forest scene in winter, spring, summer, and fall.

In Seven Yorkshire Landscape Videos, Hockney used multiple cameras simultaneously to capture a single scene, which he then displays across eighteen flat-screen monitors. The lenses of the cameras point in different directions, resulting in multiple perspectives that occasionally overlap and are out of sync, thus creating what Hockney calls a “Cubist movie.” These changing viewpoints in Hockney’s digital video installation evoke his photo collages from three decades earlier.

This work is on loan to the de Young from the artist. Don’t miss your chance to see it. Meanwhile, take time to learn more about the exhibition David Hockney: A Bigger Exhibition.

 

Images: David Hockney, Seven Yorkshire Landscape Videos, 2011. Eighteen digital videos synchronized and presented on eighteen 55-inch NEC screens to compromise a single artwork. Courtesy of the artist