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Masters of Venice: Renaissance Painters of Passion and Power from the Kunsthistorisches Museum, Vienna

October 29, 2011February 12, 2012

Masters of Venice: Renaissance Painters of Passion and Power is a worldwide exclusive presentation of 50 paintings by Venetian painters Titian, Giorgione, Veronese, Tintoretto, Mantegna, and more, primarily from the sixteenth century, all on loan from the Gemäldegalerie of the Kunsthistorisches Museum in Vienna. Featured are outstanding examples of the work of these artists that were collected by the archdukes and emperors of the Habsburg family, which are among the most celebrated holdings in the collections of the Gemäldegalerie.

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This exhibition is organized by the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco in collaboration with the Gemäldegalerie of the Kunsthistorisches Museum, Vienna.

Major Patron

Penny and James George Coulter
San Francisco Auxiliary of the Fine Arts Museums

Patrons

Athena and Timothy Blackburn
William G. Irwin Charity Foundation

Sponsors

T. Robert and Katherine Burke
Samuel H. Kress Foundation
Mrs. James K. McWilliams
Greta R. Pofcher

Education programs presented in conjunction with the exhibition are sponsored by Wells Fargo and the S. D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation.

This exhibition is supported by an indemnity from the Federal Council on the Arts and the Humanities.

Wells Fargo

Donald Judd and Sol LeWitt: Conceptual Color in Print

October 17, 2009March 8, 2010

Donald Judd was a major figure in the Minimalist art movement in the 1960s when he and others sought to create a depersonalized art in which the physical properties of space, scale, and materials were explored as phenomena of interest on their own. Judd’s use of color in three print series dating from 1988 to 1993 are on view along with a recent acquisition, Untitled (1993). Judd’s prints are compared and contrasted with prints by his peer, Sol LeWitt.

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Art and Power in the Central African Savanna

June 20, 2009October 12, 2009

This exhibition explores the political and religious power of nearly 60 sculptures created by artists of four Central African cultures: the Luba, Songye, Chokwe, and Luluwa. Carved primarily from wood, these power figures act as containers for magical organic ingredients and serve purposes both religious and political. According to traditional beliefs, the figures mediate between the human and spirit worlds to insure a healthy birth, successful hunt, or triumph over an enemy. A fully-illustrated catalogue by leading expert Constantine Pedridis accompanies the exhibition.

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Birth of Impressionism: Masterpieces from the Musée d’Orsay

May 22, 2010September 6, 2010

Birth of Impressionism: Masterpieces from the Musée d’Orsay puts forth nearly 100 works by the famous masters who called France their home during the mid-19th century and from whose midst arose one of the most original and recognizable of all artistic styles, Impressionism.

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Birth of Impressionism
Left: James Abbott McNeil Whistler, Arrangement in Gray and Black No. 1; Portrait of the Artist’s Mother, 1871. Center: Édouard Manet, The Fifer (detail), 1866. Right: Edgar Degas, The Dancing Lesson (detail), 1873-1876. All photos ©RMN (Musée d’Orsay)/Hervé Lewandowski

LECTURE: "The Odyssey of Quetzalcoatl: Art and Transnationalism in West Mexico's Late Antiquity" by John M. D. Pohl

Bowl depicting the head of a death deity, 1400-1500. Mexico, Nayarit, Aztatlan Culture
October 29, 2016 -
10:00am12:00pm

The Friends of Ethnic Art present the 2016 Elizabeth and Lewis K. Land Memorial Lecture by John M. D. Pohl, PhD; Adjunct Professor, Department of Art History, UCLA.

The ceramic arts of ancient West Mexico are renowned for their refined execution and inventive design. The abstract treatment of such subjects as fierce warriors and playful dogs appealed to collectors in the 1960s and remain highly sought after today. At the same time, a significant but lesser known tradition of highly decorative and colorful works also appeared on the art market. 

Friday Nights at the de Young presents de Young Dance-Off: Swing Part 1

Cynthia Glinka leads swing dance lessons at the de Young.
July 1, 2016 -
5:00pm8:45pm

Friday Nights at the de Young are after-hours art happenings that include a mix of live music, dance and theater performances, film screenings, panel discussions, lectures, artist demonstrations, hands-on art activities, and exhibition tours. Local artists conduct drop-in workshops, debut new commissions, display their art in the Kimball Education Gallery, and take part in conversations about the creative process. The café offers a delicious prix-fixe menu and specialty cocktails, and the Hamon Tower observation level is open until 8 pm.

Jane Kim, details from From So Simple a Beginning: Celebrating the Diversity and Evolution of Birds, 2014–2015
Kimball Education Gallery
1:00 pm

June 1–July 3, 2016
Wednesdays–Sundays, 1–5 pm, Fridays until 8:45 pm
Artist Reception: Friday June 24, 2016, 6–8:30 pm

Photo courtesy of Cynthia Glinka
Wilsey Court
6:00 pm

Master Dance Coach/Hostess Cynthia Glinka will be your guide on the dance floor as she inspires, entertains, and instructs swing dance partner stylings of the '30s and '40s.

Museum visitor shows off their art on a Friday Night at the de Young.
Buchanan Court
6:00 pm

Every week, Friday Nights at the de Young offers art-making activities to encourage everyone of all ages to tap into their creativity.

This week, create a greeting card with teaching artist Indira Urrutia.

Photo courtesy of Royal Society Jazz Orchestra
Wilsey Court
6:30 pm

Don Neely, vocalist Carla Normand, and the ten-piece Royal Society Jazz Orchestra of San Francisco are renowned for authentically performing the sounds of the 1920s.

"Kitsch to Art Moderne: Meisen Kimono in the First Half of Twentieth Century Japan"

September 17, 2016 -
10:00am11:30am

When Japan opened its doors to the West during the Meiji Restoration in 1868, the former feudal society experienced an influx of foreign culture. The resulting industrial revolution stimulated the textile industry and created a border consumer market including “commoners” who were once restricted from wearing silk or colorful kimonos. This new market created a sudden blossoming of popular designs for kimono, haori, winter baby wraps, and futon.

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