Sean Orlando

Additional Information

To learn more about this project, explore the Urbanauts website. http://urbanautsf.com/

Questions? Email amartin@famsf.org or call 415.750.3531.

The Project

Urbanauts is a speculative exploration of urban infrastructure and its relationship to the everyday experience of the contemporary city. Through a series of interwoven conversations, urban expeditions, design charettes, and conjectural artworks based at the de Young, Orlando will collaborate with Matthew Passmore (Rebar) to examine and explore the ways in which urban inhabitants relate (or don’t relate) to the largely unseen mechanical systems, societal constructs, and cultural imperatives that mediate and structure life in the built environment.

Sean Orlando

Sean Orlando is a multi-disciplinary installation artist, museum professional, and community organizer with an interest in collaborative and immersionary large-scale sculptural installation projects. Orlando is the co-founder of the Five Ton Crane Arts Group, principle artist at Engineered Artworks, and production coordinator at the Exploratorium.

His most recent collaborative group projects include the Steampunk Tree House, Raygun Gothic Rocketship and The Nautilus submarine art car. Orlando has exhibited at and collaborated with many arts organizations and venues throughout California including the Crucible, the Chabot Space and Science Center, Maker Faire, Landor and Associates, the American Welding Society, the Port of San Francsico, Coachella, Dorkbots, Burning Man, the Worth Ryder Gallery, and Warehouse 416.

The Collaborating Partners

The mission of the Black Rock Arts Foundation (BRAF) is to support and promote community, interactive art, and civic participation. Through their major programs, Grants to Artists and Civic Arts, BRAF works with communities in the Bay Area and around the world to collaboratively produce innovative, relevant, and pioneering works of public art that build community and empower individuals. Founded by several of the original producers who founded and continue to produce Burning Man, an annual arts festival in the Nevada desert, to date BRAF has supported over 90 projects worldwide. The art experienced at Burning Man invites individuals to interact with both the work itself and with their community at large, inspiring civic participation and engendering meaningful connections between individuals. BRAF was established to bring this modality of creating and coexisting with art to the rest of the world.

Photos of the artist on Flickr

Flickr photos from the album Urbanauts by FAMSF

The view into a man hole cover

Photo provided courtesy of the artists. Photo provided courtesy of the artists. An underground tunnel in the East Bay.

Photo provided courtesy of the artists. On the corner of Market and Main St in San Francisco

Photo provided courtesy of the artists. Photo provided courtesy of the artists. The view through the crack in the door of an abandon military bunker.

Photo provided courtesy of the artists. Sean Orlando

Urban Exploration: A Contemporary Introduction
de Young Artist Fellows Sean Orlando and Matthew Passmore (Rebar) with Phil P. Phil
Moderated by Annetta Black, Atlas Obscura
Introduction by Tomas Medal, Black Rock Arts Foundation
January 19, 2013, 2 pm
Koret Auditorium, de Young

Photo by Asta Karalis

This event was part of Urbanauts, Sean Orlando and Rebar’s ongoing de Young Fellowship project, which maps, examines, and documents unseen urban infrastructure to inform a series of conceptualized and fabricated objects based on the aesthetics and function of these hidden systems.de Young Artist Fellow Sean Orlando and the Five Ton Crane team spent the weekend at Maker's Faire aboard the Nautilus Submarine Art Car, built in 2011. 

Photo by Gregory Hayes of Make MagazineFor more information: www.deyoungmuseum.org/artistfellowsFor more information: www.deyoungmuseum.org/artistfellowsSean Orlando builds the Systemic sculpture in the Kimball Education Gallery/Artist Studio.

For more information: www.deyoungmuseum.org/artistfellowsMuseum visitors create their own sculptural works inspired by the infrastructure they've seen inside the Kimball Education Gallery/Artist Studio.Drainage, running water, steam, sewage treatment, pumping stations, fire-suppression systems, backflow-protection valves, emergency backup water supplies—many of these systems are hidden in plain sight behind closed doors, in basements, or beneath manhole covers that we have walked across countless times. In contemporary society we rely on these expansive engineered networks of steel, brass, cast iron, and PVC in fundamental ways that we sometimes take for granted. The careful observer detects evidence of these complex systems just below and beyond perception, seeing the 'tip of the iceberg' of the massive network of infrastructure that is, for most people, out of sight and out of mind.

During the month of June 2013, Urbanauts (Sean Orlando and Matthew Passmore) created Systemic, an installation in the de Young’s Kimball Education Gallery that multiplied, morphed, expanded, and evolved over time. Systemic comprised a complex, entangled network of pipes and valves that transformed the gallery from wall to ceiling, challenging visitors to reflect on the space they inhabit and inviting them to rethink their relationship to the unseen infrastructure that supports city life.

For more information, visit deyoung.famsf.org/education/artist-fellows. 

Photo by Adrian Arias.Black Rock Arts Foundation are the co-presenters of Urbanauts by de Young Artist Fellows Sean Orlando and Matthew Passmore. 

Drainage, running water, steam, sewage treatment, pumping stations, fire-suppression systems, backflow-protection valves, emergency backup water supplies—many of these systems are hidden in plain sight behind closed doors, in basements, or beneath manhole covers that we have walked across countless times. In contemporary society we rely on these expansive engineered networks of steel, brass, cast iron, and PVC in fundamental ways that we sometimes take for granted. The careful observer detects evidence of these complex systems just below and beyond perception, seeing the 'tip of the iceberg' of the massive network of infrastructure that is, for most people, out of sight and out of mind.

During the month of June 2013, Urbanauts (Sean Orlando and Matthew Passmore) created Systemic, an installation in the de Young’s Kimball Education Gallery that multiplied, morphed, expanded, and evolved over time. Systemic comprised a complex, entangled network of pipes and valves that transformed the gallery from wall to ceiling, challenging visitors to reflect on the space they inhabit and inviting them to rethink their relationship to the unseen infrastructure that supports city life.

For more information, visit deyoung.famsf.org/education/artist-fellows. 

Photo by Adrian Arias.

Drainage, running water, steam, sewage treatment, pumping stations, fire-suppression systems, backflow-protection valves, emergency backup water supplies—many of these systems are hidden in plain sight behind closed doors, in basements, or beneath manhole covers that we have walked across countless times. In contemporary society we rely on these expansive engineered networks of steel, brass, cast iron, and PVC in fundamental ways that we sometimes take for granted. The careful observer detects evidence of these complex systems just below and beyond perception, seeing the 'tip of the iceberg' of the massive network of infrastructure that is, for most people, out of sight and out of mind.

During the month of June 2013, Urbanauts (Sean Orlando and Matthew Passmore) created Systemic, an installation in the de Young’s Kimball Education Gallery that multiplied, morphed, expanded, and evolved over time. Systemic comprised a complex, entangled network of pipes and valves that transformed the gallery from wall to ceiling, challenging visitors to reflect on the space they inhabit and inviting them to rethink their relationship to the unseen infrastructure that supports city life.

For more information, visit deyoung.famsf.org/education/artist-fellows. 

Photo by Adrian Arias.Drainage, running water, steam, sewage treatment, pumping stations, fire-suppression systems, backflow-protection valves, emergency backup water supplies—many of these systems are hidden in plain sight behind closed doors, in basements, or beneath manhole covers that we have walked across countless times. In contemporary society we rely on these expansive engineered networks of steel, brass, cast iron, and PVC in fundamental ways that we sometimes take for granted. The careful observer detects evidence of these complex systems just below and beyond perception, seeing the 'tip of the iceberg' of the massive network of infrastructure that is, for most people, out of sight and out of mind.

During the month of June 2013, Urbanauts (Sean Orlando and Matthew Passmore) created Systemic, an installation in the de Young’s Kimball Education Gallery that multiplied, morphed, expanded, and evolved over time. Systemic comprised a complex, entangled network of pipes and valves that transformed the gallery from wall to ceiling, challenging visitors to reflect on the space they inhabit and inviting them to rethink their relationship to the unseen infrastructure that supports city life.

For more information, visit deyoung.famsf.org/education/artist-fellows. 

Photo by Adrian Arias.Drainage, running water, steam, sewage treatment, pumping stations, fire-suppression systems, backflow-protection valves, emergency backup water supplies—many of these systems are hidden in plain sight behind closed doors, in basements, or beneath manhole covers that we have walked across countless times. In contemporary society we rely on these expansive engineered networks of steel, brass, cast iron, and PVC in fundamental ways that we sometimes take for granted. The careful observer detects evidence of these complex systems just below and beyond perception, seeing the 'tip of the iceberg' of the massive network of infrastructure that is, for most people, out of sight and out of mind.

During the month of June 2013, Urbanauts (Sean Orlando and Matthew Passmore) created Systemic, an installation in the de Young’s Kimball Education Gallery that multiplied, morphed, expanded, and evolved over time. Systemic comprised a complex, entangled network of pipes and valves that transformed the gallery from wall to ceiling, challenging visitors to reflect on the space they inhabit and inviting them to rethink their relationship to the unseen infrastructure that supports city life.

For more information, visit deyoung.famsf.org/education/artist-fellows. 

Photo by Adrian Arias.Drainage, running water, steam, sewage treatment, pumping stations, fire-suppression systems, backflow-protection valves, emergency backup water supplies—many of these systems are hidden in plain sight behind closed doors, in basements, or beneath manhole covers that we have walked across countless times. In contemporary society we rely on these expansive engineered networks of steel, brass, cast iron, and PVC in fundamental ways that we sometimes take for granted. The careful observer detects evidence of these complex systems just below and beyond perception, seeing the 'tip of the iceberg' of the massive network of infrastructure that is, for most people, out of sight and out of mind.

During the month of June 2013, Urbanauts (Sean Orlando and Matthew Passmore) created Systemic, an installation in the de Young’s Kimball Education Gallery that multiplied, morphed, expanded, and evolved over time. Systemic comprised a complex, entangled network of pipes and valves that transformed the gallery from wall to ceiling, challenging visitors to reflect on the space they inhabit and inviting them to rethink their relationship to the unseen infrastructure that supports city life.

For more information, visit deyoung.famsf.org/education/artist-fellows. 

Photo by Adrian Arias.Drainage, running water, steam, sewage treatment, pumping stations, fire-suppression systems, backflow-protection valves, emergency backup water supplies—many of these systems are hidden in plain sight behind closed doors, in basements, or beneath manhole covers that we have walked across countless times. In contemporary society we rely on these expansive engineered networks of steel, brass, cast iron, and PVC in fundamental ways that we sometimes take for granted. The careful observer detects evidence of these complex systems just below and beyond perception, seeing the 'tip of the iceberg' of the massive network of infrastructure that is, for most people, out of sight and out of mind.

During the month of June 2013, Urbanauts (Sean Orlando and Matthew Passmore) created Systemic, an installation in the de Young’s Kimball Education Gallery that multiplied, morphed, expanded, and evolved over time. Systemic comprised a complex, entangled network of pipes and valves that transformed the gallery from wall to ceiling, challenging visitors to reflect on the space they inhabit and inviting them to rethink their relationship to the unseen infrastructure that supports city life.

For more information, visit deyoung.famsf.org/education/artist-fellows. 

Photo by Adrian Arias.Drainage, running water, steam, sewage treatment, pumping stations, fire-suppression systems, backflow-protection valves, emergency backup water supplies—many of these systems are hidden in plain sight behind closed doors, in basements, or beneath manhole covers that we have walked across countless times. In contemporary society we rely on these expansive engineered networks of steel, brass, cast iron, and PVC in fundamental ways that we sometimes take for granted. The careful observer detects evidence of these complex systems just below and beyond perception, seeing the 'tip of the iceberg' of the massive network of infrastructure that is, for most people, out of sight and out of mind.

During the month of June 2013, Urbanauts (Sean Orlando and Matthew Passmore) created Systemic, an installation in the de Young’s Kimball Education Gallery that multiplied, morphed, expanded, and evolved over time. Systemic comprised a complex, entangled network of pipes and valves that transformed the gallery from wall to ceiling, challenging visitors to reflect on the space they inhabit and inviting them to rethink their relationship to the unseen infrastructure that supports city life.

For more information, visit deyoung.famsf.org/education/artist-fellows. 

Photo by Adrian Arias.Drainage, running water, steam, sewage treatment, pumping stations, fire-suppression systems, backflow-protection valves, emergency backup water supplies—many of these systems are hidden in plain sight behind closed doors, in basements, or beneath manhole covers that we have walked across countless times. In contemporary society we rely on these expansive engineered networks of steel, brass, cast iron, and PVC in fundamental ways that we sometimes take for granted. The careful observer detects evidence of these complex systems just below and beyond perception, seeing the 'tip of the iceberg' of the massive network of infrastructure that is, for most people, out of sight and out of mind.

During the month of June 2013, Urbanauts (Sean Orlando and Matthew Passmore) created Systemic, an installation in the de Young’s Kimball Education Gallery that multiplied, morphed, expanded, and evolved over time. Systemic comprised a complex, entangled network of pipes and valves that transformed the gallery from wall to ceiling, challenging visitors to reflect on the space they inhabit and inviting them to rethink their relationship to the unseen infrastructure that supports city life.

For more information, visit deyoung.famsf.org/education/artist-fellows. 

Photo by Adrian Arias.Drainage, running water, steam, sewage treatment, pumping stations, fire-suppression systems, backflow-protection valves, emergency backup water supplies—many of these systems are hidden in plain sight behind closed doors, in basements, or beneath manhole covers that we have walked across countless times. In contemporary society we rely on these expansive engineered networks of steel, brass, cast iron, and PVC in fundamental ways that we sometimes take for granted. The careful observer detects evidence of these complex systems just below and beyond perception, seeing the 'tip of the iceberg' of the massive network of infrastructure that is, for most people, out of sight and out of mind.

During the month of June 2013, Urbanauts (Sean Orlando and Matthew Passmore) created Systemic, an installation in the de Young’s Kimball Education Gallery that multiplied, morphed, expanded, and evolved over time. Systemic comprised a complex, entangled network of pipes and valves that transformed the gallery from wall to ceiling, challenging visitors to reflect on the space they inhabit and inviting them to rethink their relationship to the unseen infrastructure that supports city life.

For more information, visit deyoung.famsf.org/education/artist-fellows. 

Photo by Adrian Arias.
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