de Young Artist Fellows Andy Diaz Hope and Laurel Roth: The Conflicts

The Allegory of the Prisoner's Dilemma

Andy Diaz Hope and Laurel Roth, Allegory of the Prisoner’s Dilemma, 2012. Image courtesy of the artists.

Erin Garcia
Assistant Director of Communications
tel: 415.750.8904 cell: 510.364.1304
Ken Garcia
Director of Government and Community Affairs
tel: 415.750.3616 cell: 415.513.3557

Kimball Education Gallery
March 6–March 31, 2013

SAN FRANCISCO (February 28, 2013)—During the month of March in the Kimball Education Gallery, de Young Artist Fellows Andy Diaz Hope and LaurelRoth will exhibit their triptych of tapestries, The Conflicts, completed during their year-long fellowship at the museum. 

About the project

This vibrant triptych is the most recent work created by San Francisco artists Diaz Hope and Roth.  Inspired by the famous Unicorn Tapestries (now housed at The Cloisters in New York), the work is structured on the three fundamental conflicts in literature: human versus nature, human versus himself/herself, and human versus human. The Conflicts merges the traditional tapestry aesthetic and narrative function with contemporary technology and cultural content. The Kimball Education Gallery will be open for viewing Tuesdays‒Sundays, 1‒5 pm and Fridays until 8:45 pm.

This project is presented in partnership with Magnolia Editions and Bergarde Galleries and with the San Francisco Public Library, whose main branch will exhibit sketches and preliminary works that illuminate the creation process of The Conflicts triptych from April 6–July 6. The Library will also sponsor a small research library in the Kimball Education Gallery throughout the month of March, offering literature related to the topics explored in the tapestries.

About Andy Diaz Hope and Laurel Roth

After receiving his bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Stanford University’s Joint Program in Design—a collaborative program between the engineering and art departments—Andy Diaz Hope has exhibited his work both nationally and internationally. Venues include the Museum of Art and Design in New York, the Palo Alto Art Center, the International Museum of Surgical Science in Chicago, the National Gallery of Victoria in Australia, and the London Crafts Council. His work is included in the collections of The Museum of Modern Art, New York and the International Contemporary Art Foundation in Louisville, Kentucky. Diaz Hope currently resides in San Francisco and has been exhibiting with Catharine Clark Gallery since 2005. He is also represented by Schroeder Romero & Shredder Gallery in New York City.

Laurel Roth has worked as a park ranger and in natural resource conservation—experiences that largely influenced her current work, which centers on the human manipulation of and intervention into the natural world. Roth’s work has been exhibited at the Museum of Art and Design in New York and the International Museum of Surgical Science in Chicago, and is included in the permanent collections of the Smithsonian, the 21C Museum, the Ripley’s Museum of Hollywood, and the Museum of Art and Design in New York, among others. She is represented by Gallery Wendi Norris in San Francisco, Schroeder Romero & Shredder Gallery in New York, and Packer Schopf Gallery in Chicago.

Related Programs

Programs are presented in partnership with Magnolia Editions and Bergarde Galleries. The lecture series is free and open to the public. Seating is first-come first-served. 

Saturday, March 16, 2–3 pm
Piazzoni Murals Room, de Young
Architecture Archi-torture Agri-tecture
Nathaniel Corum, architect

Tuesday, March 26, 6:30–7:30 pm
Piazzoni Murals Room, de Young
From Digital to Woven Image: Making a Jacquard Tapestry
Donald Farnsworth, director of Magnolia Editions

Friday, March 29, 6-8:45 pm
Kimball Education Gallery, de Young
Artist Reception
Join us in celebrating the artists’ yearlong fellowship and their completed triptych of tapestries. Refreshments served while they last.

Saturday, March 30, 2–3 pm
Piazzoni Murals Room, de Young
The Stories We Live In: Architecture, Literature, and Ideology
Stefanie Sobelle, professor of English at Gettysburg College

Visiting
de Young Museum
Golden Gate Park
50 Hagiwara Tea Garden Drive
San Francisco, CA 94118
deyoungmuseum.org
415-750-3600

Museum Hours
Tuesday–Sunday, 9:30 am–5:15 pm, last ticket 4:30 pm
Friday (March 29–November 29, 2013) 9:30 am–8:45 pm, last ticket 8 pm
Closed Mondays

General Admission
$10 Adults
$7 Seniors (age 65 and over)
$6 Youths (age 13–17) and College Students with ID
FREE Members and children 12 and under
FREE general admission the first Tuesday of each month
Additional fees may apply for special exhibitions

About the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco
The Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, comprising the de Young Museum in Golden Gate Park and the Legion of Honor in Lincoln Park, is the largest public arts institution in San Francisco.

The de Young is housed in a copper-clad landmark building designed by Swiss architects Herzog and de Meuron. It showcases the institution’s significant collections of American painting, sculpture, and decorative arts from the 17th to the 21st centuries; art from Oceania, Africa, and the Americas; a diverse collection of costumes and textiles; and international contemporary art.

The Legion of Honor’s Beaux-Arts style building designed by George Applegarth is located on a bluff overlooking the Golden Gate Bridge. Its collections span 4,000 years and include European paintings, sculptures, and decorative arts; ancient art from the Mediterranean basin; and the largest collection of works on paper in the American West.

Media Contacts
Erin Garcia egarcia@famsf.org
Arlo Crawford acrawford@famsf.org
Clara Hatcher chatcher@famsf.org

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