Cartier and America

Cartier Tutti Frutti Necklace
Erin Garcia
Assistant Director of Communications
tel: 415.750.8904 cell: 510.364.1304
Maureen Keefe
Director of Marketing and Communications
tel: 415.750.8903 cell: 415.246.3099

Coming to the Legion of Honor in December


San Francisco, September 2009
Cartier and America covers the history of the House of Cartier from its first great successes as the “king of jewelers and jeweler to kings” during the Belle Epoque through to the 1960s and 1970s, when Cartier supplied celebrities of the day with their jewels and luxury accessories. Derived mainly from the private Cartier Collection housed in Geneva, the spectacular array of more than 200 objects includes jewelry of the Gilded Age and Art Deco periods, as well as freestanding works of art such as the famous Mystery Clocks. With an extensive variety of jewelry forms—ranging from traditional white diamond suites to the highly colored exotic creations of the 1920s and 1930s—Cartier made its mark with the ingenuity of its designs and its exquisite craftsmanship. The exhibition, open December 19, 2009, to April 18, 2010, is exclusive to the Legion of Honor.

Marking Cartier’s 100 years in the United States, the exhibition concentrates on pieces owned by Americans, including a pair of rock crystal and diamond bracelets worn by Gloria Swanson in the movie Sunset Boulevard, Daisy Fellowes’s famous “Tutti Frutti” necklace, and the exotic flamingo brooch made for the Duchess of Windsor. Private lenders in the United States and France have contributed significant pieces to the exhibition. For the first time, an American museum will feature the personal jewelry of Princess Grace of Monaco from the time of her wedding to Rainier III, Prince of Monaco, in 1956. These, generously lent by H.S.H. Prince Albert II, include her engagement ring—a 10.47-carat emerald-cut diamond set with two baguette diamonds mounted in platinum––a grand diamond necklace, and more informal gold brooches in the form of birds. The Lindemann Collection of Palm Beach is sharing some of its incomparable clocks, and the Hillwood Museum in Washington, D.C., is lending jewelry made for cereal heiress Marjorie Merriweather Post, a longtime Cartier patron. Post’s brooch, one of the most spectacular pieces of jewelry made in the 1920s, incorporates Indian carved emeralds, one of which dates from the Mughal era.

Exhibition curator Martin Chapman declares, "This is a great opportunity to see some of the finest pieces of jewelry, clocks, and works of art by the legendary firm of Cartier—made for Americans or made in America.”

Catalogue
In the exhibition catalogue, author and curator Martin Chapman offers an in-depth exploration of how Cartier conquered America, tracing compelling connections with key patrons. The publication, titled Cartier and America, features numerous commissions for American “royalty,” Hollywood stars, and heiresses. American notables who famously collected Cartier include Marion Davies, Mrs. Cole Porter, Mary Pickford, Barbara Hutton, and Elizabeth Taylor. The catalogue presents images of significant objects complemented, whenever possible, with archival photographs showing the celebrities with their jewels. It will be available in the Museum Store in December 2009. A self-guided audio tour produced by Discovery Audio will be available in the exhibition.

Organization
Cartier in America is organized by the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco in partnership with Cartier. The major patron is Lonna Wais. Dr. Alan R. Malouf, Trish Turner and Tom McConnell are sponsor. The official airline is Emirates.

Visiting the Legion of Honor
The Legion of Honor displays a collection spanning more than 4,000 years of ancient and European art and houses the Achenbach Foundation for Graphic Arts in a neoclassical building overlooking Lincoln Park and the Golden Gate Bridge.

Address: Lincoln Park, 34th Avenue and Clement Street
San Francisco, CA 94121, 415.750.3600

Hours: Tuesday–Sunday, 9:30 am–5:15 pm; closed on Monday

Admission: $10 adults; $7 seniors; $6 youths 13–17 and students with college I.D. Members and children 12 and under are free. General admission is free the first Tuesday of every month $10 special exhibition surcharge for Cartier and America

Information: legionofhonor.org

Group Sales: For adult groups of 15 or more contact groupsales@famsf.org.