Get Smart with Art 4–8th grade Reservation Request

Get Smart with Art—Guided Gallery Visits and Studio Art Activity, Grades 4–8

General Guidelines

  • Please use one reservation form for each class, you may keep a copy for your records.
  • Requests will be processed in the order received.
  • Please note that the maximum size of a class group is 30 students; however, 6th grade Get Smart with Art at the Legion of Honor can accommodate up to 90 students. Larger groups require multiple slots. All requests are subject to availability.
  • Get Smart with Art is free.
Name of teacher who will accompany students
School information
Second contact
Please do not schedule transportation before receiving a tour confirmation.
About your students
You know your students best. Please help our staff and docents prepare to meet their needs and expectations by sharing the following information.
Please share any information that will help our staff and docents engage your students. . (For example, special needs unit studies the museum trip relates to, accommodations or any other concerns).
For example, a call and response routine, quiet coyote hand symbol, etc.
For example, thumbs up, sideways, down.
I am requesting a...
Preferred dates and times

Groups are not scheduled on the free first Tuesday of every month nor during Bouquets to Art week (March 1318, 2018).

First choice
Second choice
Third choice
Fourth choice
Fifth choice
Sixth choice

Questions?

Learning to Look K–3rd grade Reservation Request

Learning to Look—Guided Gallery Visits and Studio Art Activity Grades K–3

General Guidelines

  • A minimum of 8 weeks' advance notice is required.
  • Please use one reservation form for each class, you may keep a copy for your records.
  • Requests will be processed in the order received.
  • Please note that the maximum size of a class group is 30 students. Larger groups require multiple slots. All requests are subject to availability. 
  • Get Smart with Art is free.
Name of teacher who will accompany students
School information
Please do not schedule transportation without receiving a tour confirmation.
You know your students best. Please help our staff and docents prepare to meet their needs and expectations by sharing the following information.
For example, special needs, unit studies the museum trip relates to, accommodations, or any other concerns.
For example, a call and response routine, quiet coyote hand symbol, etc.
For example, thumbs up, sideways, down.
I am requesting a…
Preferred dates and times

 Groups are not scheduled on the first free Tuesday of every month nor during Bouquets to Art week (March 1318, 2018).

First choice
Second choice
Third choice
Fourth choice
Fifth choice
Sixth choice

Questions?

Pat Steir: After Hokusai, After Hiroshige

July 17, 2010February 10, 2011

Complementing Japanesque at the Legion of Honor, this exhibition shows the continued influence of the Japanese print on Western artists into the late twentieth century. American painter, printmaker, and conceptual artist Pat Steir (b. 1938) was the first artist selected by Kathan Brown in 1982 to travel to Japan to make a color woodcut for Crown Point Press’s groundbreaking printmaking program in Kyoto.

Location: 
Pat Steir: After Hokusai, after Hiroshige

Yellow Bridge in the Rain after Van Gogh after Hiroshige, 1985 Color monotype, spit-bite aquatint, and etching

To Dye For: A World Saturated in Color

July 31, 2010January 9, 2011

To Dye For features over 50 textiles and costumes from the Fine Arts Museums’ comprehensive collection of textiles from Africa, Asia and the Americas. A truly cross-cultural presentation, the exhibition showcases objects from diverse cultures and historical periods, including a tie-dyed mantle from the Wari-Nasca culture of pre-Hispanic Peru (500–900 A.D.), a paste-resist Mongolian felt rug from the 15th–17th century and a group of stitch-resist dyed 20th-century kerchiefs from the Dida people of the Ivory Coast.

Location: 

Sponsors

To Dye For: A World Saturated in Color is organized by the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco and supported by Olive and Bruce Baganz, Dr. Donald Breyer, Mary F. Connors, Dr. Guido Goldman, Harry and Diane Greenberg, Thomas Murray, Francesca Passalacqua and Don Ed Hardy, S. Peter Poullada and Nancy Sheppard, San Francisco Tribal, and Fifi White. Additional support provided by Britex Fabrics, Judith and Reed Content, Barbara and Dolph Shapiro, and Peter and Beverly Sinton.

Left: Mat (mosen) for the tea ceremony, 19th century. Mongolia or China for the Japanese market Wool; felted, resist dyeing (tie-dye). Right: Felt rug, 15th–17th century, Mongolia. Wool; felt, stencil-resist dyed

Volunteer

With their numerous exhibitions and community programs, both the de Young and the Legion of Honor rely greatly on the Fine Arts Museums' Volunteer Council, a vital, 300-member organization that provides visitor services and staff support six days a week.

Patrons Circle

Contact Information

Emily Christian
Director of Individual Giving
​echristian@famsf.org
415.750.3555

Alexandra Higgins
Manager of Individual Giving
ahiggins@famsf.org
415.750.3508

Ellen McKinstry
Development Associate, Individual Giving
emckinstry@famsf.org
415.750.8907

Deepen the role that art plays in your life by joining our Patrons Circle.

The Patrons Circle brings together a group of dedicated art enthusiasts whose annual contributions of $2,500 or more enable the Fine Arts Museums to share the transformative power of art with an ever-widening audience.  Join this community of donors and enjoy insider access and compelling learning opportunities with an array of exclusive benefits.

Expand your philanthropic impact and invest in the future of the arts by joining the Leadership Circle with a gift of $25,000 or more.

Individual Giving

Contact Information

Pam Earing
Director of Individual Giving
415.750.8940
pearing@famsf.org

Larissa Trociuk, Individual Giving Officer
415.750.3641
ltrociuk@famsf.org

Major gifts of support have a significant impact on the Museum’s ability to present new exhibitions, offer the highest-quality of educational programming, and engage audiences in interactive experiences with art.   They enable the conservation of FAMSF’s collections, and inspire capital projects which support asset-building needs.  Major gifts come in many forms and can be made through cash contributions, gifts of appreciated securities, bequests and planned gifts, or in-kind gifts such as contributions of valuable art.

Photo/Synthesis

May 1, 2010October 3, 2010

Photo/Synthesis highlights the dynamic trend in the field of contemporary photography, collages, assemblages, and other multi-part or composite photo-based projects. Dating from the 1960s to the present, the works in this exhibition transcend the limitations of traditional photography in which the camera simply captures a unique view or a decisive moment in time. Breaking free of the conventional frame, they are instead the products of various methods of assembling and organizing multiple photographic images into larger artistic statements.

Location: 
David Hockney (British, b. 1937), Luncheon at the British Embassy, Tokyo, Feb. 16, 1983 1983. Photocollage. 1996.74.183

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