Individual Giving

Contact Information

Pam Earing
Director of Individual Giving
415.750.8940
pearing@famsf.org

Larissa Trociuk, Individual Giving Officer
415.750.3641
ltrociuk@famsf.org

Major gifts of support have a significant impact on the Museum’s ability to present new exhibitions, offer the highest-quality of educational programming, and engage audiences in interactive experiences with art.   They enable the conservation of FAMSF’s collections, and inspire capital projects which support asset-building needs.  Major gifts come in many forms and can be made through cash contributions, gifts of appreciated securities, bequests and planned gifts, or in-kind gifts such as contributions of valuable art.

Photo/Synthesis

May 1, 2010October 3, 2010

Photo/Synthesis highlights the dynamic trend in the field of contemporary photography, collages, assemblages, and other multi-part or composite photo-based projects. Dating from the 1960s to the present, the works in this exhibition transcend the limitations of traditional photography in which the camera simply captures a unique view or a decisive moment in time. Breaking free of the conventional frame, they are instead the products of various methods of assembling and organizing multiple photographic images into larger artistic statements.

Location: 
David Hockney (British, b. 1937), Luncheon at the British Embassy, Tokyo, Feb. 16, 1983 1983. Photocollage. 1996.74.183

I Keep Foolin’ Around: William T. Wiley as Printmaker

March 20, 2010July 5, 2010

Bay Area artist William T. Wiley (b. 1937) is well known as a painter, sculptor, and draftsman whose imagery is infused with a lively blend of satiric wit, cultural commentary, and storytelling. I Keep Foolin’ Around focuses on his significant work in printmaking and features prints from the museum’s collection, including its William T. Wiley Print Archive and the Crown Point Press Archive.

Location: 
It's Only a Pay Per Moon, 1974. Color lithograph on chamois with hand-coloring. 1978.1.179

Business Council

What kind of impact does your company want to have in the community? What kind of cultural engagement opportunities do you envision for your employees?

Membership in the Business Council engages businesses of all sizes and from a wide variety of industries in the cultural life of our community and demonstrates a company's commitment to the arts.

Planned Giving

Contact Information

Larissa Trociuk
Associate Director for Major Giving
ltrociuk@famsf.org
415.750.3641

The Fine Arts Museums have served our community for more than a century, and we are dedicated to fulfilling our important mission for the benefit of generations to come. This commitment is supported each year by many thoughtful and forward-thinking individuals who give through their estates. Estate planning offers donors the opportunity to transform a love of art into a lasting cultural legacy for the Museums and for the community.

The Museums offer a variety of tools for informed decision-making and numerous gift options that can fulfill your personal and financial goals.

Japanesque: The Japanese Print in the Era of Impressionism

October 16, 2010January 9, 2011

The Japanese Print in the Era of Impressionism introduces audiences to the development of the Japanese print over two centuries (1700–1900) and reveals its profound influence on Western art during the era of Impressionism. This exhibition complements the de Young Museum’s presentations of paintings from the Musée d'Orsay, many of which are aesthetically indebted to concepts of Japanese art.

Location: 
Left: Hiroshige, Gion Shrine in the Snow (Gionsha setchu), from the series Famous Places in Kyoto (Kyoto meisho no uchi), ca. 1833–1834. Right: Henri Riviere, La Tour en construction, vue de Trocadero, pl. 3 from the book Les Trente-Six Vues de la Tour Eiffel, 1902. Color lithograph © 2010 ARS, New York / ADAGP, Paris

Impressionist Paris: City of Light

June 5, 2010September 26, 2010

La ville lumière—“the City of Light”: Paris earned this nickname during the 19th century with the proliferation of gas lamps that lit up the French capital, turning night into day and boosting its economic vitality. Moreover, the radiance of the metropolis transcended the glow of its streetlights as Paris ascended to its role as the cultural capital of Europe. Authors, composers, and especially visual artists—painters, sculptors, printmakers, and photographers—thrived in this dazzling setting.

Location: 

Sponsors

Presenting Sponsor
Bank of the West

Lead Sponsor
Boucheron - Paris

Additional support provided by GOODBYES.

Impressionist Paris: City of Light
Left: Georges Seurat (1859–1891) Eiffel Tower, ca. 1889. Oil on panel. Center: Edgar Degas (1834–1917), Mary Cassatt at the Louvre: The Etruscan Gallery, 1879–1880. Aquatint, drypoint, soft-ground etching, and etching with burnishing. Right: Charles Marville (1816–1879), Street Lamp, 8 Place de l'Opera, ca. 1870–1879. Albumen silver print from wet-collodion-on-glass negative

Kenneth Patchen: Painted Books and Picture-Poems

November 21, 2009March 22, 2010

Already an established writer known for his pacifist sympathies and the 1941 anti-war novel Journal of Albion Moonlight, Kenneth Patchen (1911–1972) and his wife, Miriam, settled in the Telegraph Hill neighborhood of San Francisco in 1950. They became friendly with Lawrence Ferlinghetti, founder of the City Lights publishing company and bookstore and Patchen became a contributor to Ferlinghetti’s Pocket Poets series.

Location: 
The Little Bug Angel from A Surprise for the Bagpipe Player, 1955.

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