Masters of Venice: Renaissance Painters of Passion and Power from the Kunsthistorisches Museum, Vienna

October 29, 2011February 12, 2012

Masters of Venice: Renaissance Painters of Passion and Power is a worldwide exclusive presentation of 50 paintings by Venetian painters Titian, Giorgione, Veronese, Tintoretto, Mantegna, and more, primarily from the sixteenth century, all on loan from the Gemäldegalerie of the Kunsthistorisches Museum in Vienna. Featured are outstanding examples of the work of these artists that were collected by the archdukes and emperors of the Habsburg family, which are among the most celebrated holdings in the collections of the Gemäldegalerie.

Key works include Titian’s sumptuous Danáe (1560s), Mantegna’s tortured Saint Sebastian (1457–1459) and four rare paintings by Giorgione, including The Three Philosophers (ca. 1508–1509) and Portrait of a Young Woman (Laura) (1506). The exhibition also includes works by Palma, Bordone, Bassano, and more. Together, these examples represent the range of Venetian accomplishment in Renaissance-era painting.

Exhibition Preview

Portrait of a Young Woman (Laura)
Portrait of Sebastiano Venier (and the Battle of Lepanto)
Judith with the Head of Holofernes
Portrait of Isabella d'Este, Marchioness of Mantua
Danaë
Portrait of Johann Frederich, Elector of Saxony
The Three Philosophers
Allegory of Mars, Venus and Cupid
Saint Sebastian
Lucretia
Youth with an arrow

This exhibition is organized by the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco in collaboration with the Gemäldegalerie of the Kunsthistorisches Museum, Vienna.

Major Patron

Penny and James George Coulter
San Francisco Auxiliary of the Fine Arts Museums

Patrons

Athena and Timothy Blackburn
William G. Irwin Charity Foundation

Sponsors

T. Robert and Katherine Burke
Samuel H. Kress Foundation
Mrs. James K. McWilliams
Greta R. Pofcher

Education programs presented in conjunction with the exhibition are sponsored by Wells Fargo and the S. D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation.

This exhibition is supported by an indemnity from the Federal Council on the Arts and the Humanities.

Wells Fargo