Masters of Venice: Renaissance Painters of Passion and Power from the Kunsthistorisches Museum, Vienna

October 29, 2011February 12, 2012

Masters of Venice: Renaissance Painters of Passion and Power is a worldwide exclusive presentation of 50 paintings by Venetian painters Titian, Giorgione, Veronese, Tintoretto, Mantegna, and more, primarily from the sixteenth century, all on loan from the Gemäldegalerie of the Kunsthistorisches Museum in Vienna. Featured are outstanding examples of the work of these artists that were collected by the archdukes and emperors of the Habsburg family, which are among the most celebrated holdings in the collections of the Gemäldegalerie.

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Sponsors

This exhibition is organized by the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco in collaboration with the Gemäldegalerie of the Kunsthistorisches Museum, Vienna.

Major Patron

Penny and James George Coulter
San Francisco Auxiliary of the Fine Arts Museums

Patrons

Athena and Timothy Blackburn
William G. Irwin Charity Foundation

Sponsors

T. Robert and Katherine Burke
Samuel H. Kress Foundation
Mrs. James K. McWilliams
Greta R. Pofcher

Education programs presented in conjunction with the exhibition are sponsored by Wells Fargo and the S. D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation.

This exhibition is supported by an indemnity from the Federal Council on the Arts and the Humanities.

Wells Fargo

Donald Judd and Sol LeWitt: Conceptual Color in Print

October 17, 2009March 8, 2010

Donald Judd was a major figure in the Minimalist art movement in the 1960s when he and others sought to create a depersonalized art in which the physical properties of space, scale, and materials were explored as phenomena of interest on their own. Judd’s use of color in three print series dating from 1988 to 1993 are on view along with a recent acquisition, Untitled (1993). Judd’s prints are compared and contrasted with prints by his peer, Sol LeWitt.

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Art and Power in the Central African Savanna

June 20, 2009October 12, 2009

This exhibition explores the political and religious power of nearly 60 sculptures created by artists of four Central African cultures: the Luba, Songye, Chokwe, and Luluwa. Carved primarily from wood, these power figures act as containers for magical organic ingredients and serve purposes both religious and political. According to traditional beliefs, the figures mediate between the human and spirit worlds to insure a healthy birth, successful hunt, or triumph over an enemy. A fully-illustrated catalogue by leading expert Constantine Pedridis accompanies the exhibition.

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Kay Sekimachi: Student, Teacher, Artist

Produced in close collaboration with San Francisco native Kay Sekimachi (b. 1926), a pioneer in the post-World War II fiber art movement, this exhibition offers a glimpse into the working processes of one of America’s most important weavers. The presentation includes a range of materials totaling over 30 artworks, from small studies to fully realized creations that trace Sekimachi’s evolution from student to artist.

Kay Sekimachi: Student, Teacher, Artist

Produced in close collaboration with San Francisco native Kay Sekimachi (b. 1926), a pioneer in the post-World War II fiber art movement, this exhibition offers a glimpse into the working processes of one of America’s most important weavers. The presentation includes a range of materials totaling over 30 artworks, from small studies to fully realized creations that trace Sekimachi’s evolution from student to artist.

The Māori Portraits: Gottfried Lindauer's New Zealand

Come face to face with the leading Māori protagonists of nineteenth-century New Zealand in a series of arresting images by the country’s most prolific portrait painter, Gottfried Lindauer. These paintings, revered embodiments of Māori ancestors, capture the fascinating personal stories of his subjects as well as the complex intercultural exchanges occurring at a time of great political, cultural and social change.

Revelations: Art from the African American South

Revelations: Art from the African American South celebrates the debut of the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco major acquisition from the Souls Grown Deep Foundation in Atlanta of 62 works by contemporary African American artists from the Southern United States.

Sarah Lucas: Good Muse

Sarah Lucas has gained notoriety for creating sculptures and installations that showcase the innate crudeness of stereotypical conceptions of gender and sexuality. From the outset, Lucas has used self-portraiture to debunk conservative notions of femininity, adopting stances associated with male behavior that purposefully foster sexual ambiguity. Lucas’s penchant for androgyny has also filtered into her sculpture, with bodies that flaunt both male and female attitudes and attributes and deny any clear association with either. 

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