Teotihuacan Resources

Bibliography and Related Articles

Bibliography

Berlo, Janet Catherine. Ed. Art, Ideology, and the City of Teotihuacan: A Symposium at Dumbarton Oaks, 8th and 9th October 1988. Washington, D.C.: Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection, 1992.

Berrin, Kathleen, Ed. Feathered Serpents and Flowering Trees: Reconstructing the Murals of Teotihuacan. San Francisco: Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, 1988.

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Collaborative Conservation Project with Mexico

Harald Wagner died in 1976, stipulating in a handwritten will that his collection of wall paintings from the ancient city and ceremonial center of Teotihuacan, Mexico, be left to the de Young Museum of the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco. The Wagner Bequest, completely unknown to the Museums until after the donor’s death, consisted of more than seventy fragments (ranging in size from a few inches in length to fourteen feet) that date to A.D. 400–700.

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Where Did the Murals Come From?

View of Teotihuacan from the Pyramid of the Moon

Teotihuacan: A.D. 1–750

The site of Teotihuacan, which is about an hour north of Mexico City, was a single large city built on a grid plan. Begun before A.D. 1, with a population estimated at 40,000, Teotihuacan lasted for over seven hundred years. At its peak, 100,000 to 200,000 people lived within the city’s boundaries, roughly eight square miles. Throughout its history, Teotihuacan was the most populous and influential city in Mesoamerica.

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Who Was Harald Wagner?

Harald J. Wagner (also known as Harold, although the former was his preferred spelling) was the only child of Charles Jacob Wagner and Amelia Wagner. He was born in the small farming town of Falls City, Oregon, in 1903. Very little is known of his early life, although it is believed that he was strictly reared. After completing high school he attended the University of Oregon at Eugene, and studied English, civil engineering, architecture, and music, ultimately graduating with a degree in architecture. By 1927 he moved to San Francisco.

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