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Frank Stella: A Retrospective

Herbst Exhibition Galleries
November 5, 2016February 26, 2017

Frank Stella: A Retrospective is the first comprehensive US exhibition of the artist’s work since 1970. In 1959, at the age of 23, Stella (b. 1936) burst onto the New York art scene as an already mature artist with his now-legendary series of black paintings, which served as a pictorial manifesto of the artist’s assertion that a painting was “a flat surface with paint on it—nothing more.”

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This exhibition is organized by the Museum of Modern Art, Fort Worth, and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York. Additional support is provided by Peggy and Richard Greenfield, and Dr. Giselle Parry-Farris and Mr. Ray K. Farris.

Frank Stella, Lac Laronge III, 1969

Frank Stella, Lac Laronge III, 1969. Acrylic on canvas, 108 x 162 in. (274.3 × 411.5 cm). Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York; Gift of Seymour H. Knox, Jr., 1970, K1970:8. © 2016 Frank Stella / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Frank Stella: A Retrospective

On the Grid: Textiles and Minimalism

TEXTILE GALLERIES
July 23, 2016April 2, 2017

On the Grid: Textiles and Minimalism presents a broad range of textile traditions from around the world that share many of the same aesthetic choices ascribed to Minimalist works. This exploration underscores the universality of the movement’s underlying design principles, which include regular, symmetrical, or gridded arrangements; repetition of modular elements; direct use and presentation of materials; and an absence of ornamentation. 

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Entry to this exhibition is included with general admission to the museum.

Adults $10, seniors 65+ $7, students with current ID $6, youths 13–17 $6, members and children 12 and under free. Prices subject to change without notice.

Buddhist altar cloth (uchishiki), early 19th century

Buddhist altar cloth (uchishiki), early 19th century. Japan, late Edo period. Silk, gold leaf paper strips; twill lampas, supplementary-weft patterning (kinran), 118.9 x 122.7 cm (46 13/16 x 48 5/16 in.). FAMSF, gift of Miss Carlotta Mabury, 54688.36 

On the Grid: Textiles and Minimalism

The Sumatran Ship Cloth

Gallery 31
April 2, 2016February 12, 2017

The Sumatran Ship Cloth presents three ceremonial textiles from the Lampung region of south Sumatra, a region of Indonesia where ship imagery is a prominent theme in woven arts. For many Indonesians, the sea represents their lifeblood, and ship imagery reflects social structures, rituals, and cosmological beliefs. These textiles from the Museums’ permanent collection, dating from the 19th and 20th centuries, are being shown for the first time.

Location 
Ticket Information 

Entry to this exhibition is included with general admission to the museum.

Adults $10, seniors 65+ $7, students with current ID $6, youths 13–17 $6, members and children 12 and under free. Prices subject to change without notice.

Ceremonial hanging (palepai) (detail), 19th century

Ceremonial hanging (palepai) (detail), 19th century. Indonesia, Sumatra, Lampung, Kalianda. Handspun cotton; plain weave with supplementary-weft patterning, 129 15/16 x 27 3/16 in. (330 x 69 cm). Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco; museum purchase, Textile Arts Council Endowment Fund and the Nasaw Family Foundation Fund, 2010.18   

Guest Lecture: "The Life and Art of Chiura Obata", by Kimi Kodani Hill

Obata, Lake Basin in High Sierra
April 14, 2016 -
10:00am12:00pm

Kimi Kodani Hill is the granddaughter of Chiura Obata, and the Obata family historian. A graduate of UC Berkeley and California College of Arts and Crafts, she has served as the consultant for numerous Obata projects and exhibits. She is the editor of Shades of California: The Hidden Beauty of Ordinary Life and Topaz Moon: Chiura Obata’s Art of the Internment.

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