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Guest Lecture: "Docents as Storytellers", by Chris Baty

September 22, 2016 -
10:30am12:00pm

Chris Baty founded National Novel Writing Month in 1999, and oversaw the event's growth from 21 friends to more than 300,000 writers in 90 countries. Baty serves as a Board Member Emeritus for NaNoWriMo, and teaches at Stanford University's Writer's Studio, giving talks about writing and creativity, helping companies with content strategy, and endlessly revising his own novels. He's the author of No Plot? No Problem! and the co-author of Ready, Set, Novel.

Panel Discussion: "Printing Ed Ruscha"

Ed Ruscha, Coyote, 1989
September 23, 2016 - 7:00pm

Printing Ed Ruscha is the 2016 Anderson Lecture on American Graphic Arts, which this year takes the form of a panel discussion with four master printers who have worked with Ed Ruscha: Renée Bott, Paulson Bott Press, formerly of Crown Point Press, where she worked with Ruscha; Ed Hamilton, Hamilton Press; Shaye Remba, Mixografia; and Jacob Samuel, Edition Jacob Samuel. Each participant will provide a brief overview of their press and their personal history working with Ed Ruscha, followed by a conversation.

Guest Lectures presented by THE THING Quarterly

September 9, 2016 - 6:30pm

THE THING Quarterly Presents:
THREE PRESENTATIONS
VARIOUS TOPICS
REGARDING ED RUSCHA

THE THING Quarterly organizes an evening of speakers responding to themes and motifs in the exhibition, Ed Ruscha and the Great American WestFeaturing Jeff Gunderson, Librarian and Archivist at the Anne Bremer Memorial Library of the San Francisco Art Institute; photographer David Maisel; Julie Caine, managing producer for Crosscurrents, KALW’s award-winning newsmagazine.

Guest Lecture, "Food as Ink: Ed Ruscha's Screenprints from the 1970s" by Heather Brown

Soiled silkscreen following the printing of mockups for Ed Ruscha’s Stews (1970). From left to right, the ingredients are: crushed baked beans, caviar, mango chutney, fresh strawberries, cherry pie filling, tomato paste, flowers, and leaves
September 2, 2016 - 7:15pm

In 1970, artist Ed Ruscha produced a series of organic screenprints using food and other household products as the "ink." How does it work to print with caviar and baked beans? Why did he use food as his medium? Do these materials hold up over time? Join Heather Brown, Mellon Fellow in Paper Conservation at the Fine Arts Museums, in a lecture about this process.

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